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2011 October | Talk Energy
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Handout on Energy Efficiency Energy Action Plan Approaches and Resources (Part 2)

An Energy Efficiency Action Plan (EEAP) is developed through a multi-step process.  The following guidelines for EEAP development present potential steps and considerations based on the experience of energy efficiency action plans from around the world, with resources identified for further information.  This document is based in part on the IEA’s Energy Efficiency Governance Handbook, 2010. (http://www.iea.org/papers/2010/gov_handbook.pdf)

Part 2 of 2.

Step 6: Distribution of Responsibilities and Accountability: Specific action items (i.e., the implementation of policies and programs) must be assigned and integrated into current sector level programs and plans.  Also, it is important to establish accountability for the plan’s effectiveness.  Centralized accountability may simplify plan management and facilitate better coordination and evaluation. Conversely, distributed accountability engages a wider community in support of the plan by expanding ownership of policy and program impacts.

Step 7: Circulation, Discussion, and Refinement of the Energy Efficiency Action Plan.  Draft plans should be broadly shared for review by key government policymakers and business and NGO stakeholders.  This will both help determine whether adjustments may be needed to strengthen the EAAP and will also build support of these stakeholders for plan implementation.    Read more

Handout on Energy Efficiency Energy Action Plan Approaches and Resources (Part 1)

A friend of mine, Mr. Ron Beniof from U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory prepared a Handout on Energy Efficiency Energy Action Plan Approaches and Resources for IPEEC/WEACT ASEAN Regional Energy Efficiency Workshop that was held on 18-20 October 2011 in Jakarta.

Indeed, it’s a short but comprehensive information on how we should develop the Energy Efficiency Action Plan. With his permission, I am pleased to share it with you.

Here is the part 1 of 2.

An Energy Efficiency Action Plan (EEAP) is developed through a multi-step process.  The following guidelines for EEAP development present potential steps and considerations based on the experience of energy efficiency action plans from around the world, with resources identified for further information.  This document is based in part on the IEA’s Energy Efficiency Governance Handbook, 2010.

(http://www.iea.org/papers/2010/gov_handbook.pdf)

Step 1: Stakeholder Engagement:  Active stakeholder participation is essential to ensure that both a high quality plan is developed and that strong and enduring support is secured for plan implementation.

Fukushima Report : No.4

Just received the Fukushima Report No 4.

It’s been a while since I received the Fukhushima Report No.3 from Japanese WEC Member Committees. And, it has passed six months since a magnitude-9 earthquake and an ensuing tsunami inflicted devastating damage on northeastern Japan on March 11.

The earthquake caused three nuclear reactors that were in operation at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station to be shut down as a safety mechanism through the emergency insertion of control rods, which halted the nuclear chain reaction. The giant tsunami, more than 14 meters high, subsequently struck the nuclear power station, causing the loss of all auxiliary power sources, including emergency backups.

In this 4th report, some key information that you’ll find are:

1. Overview

(1) 6 months since 3.11 : Key points of the accident, Disposal of massive radioactive water, and Roadmap toward stabilizing the accident.

(2) Recent situation of the damaged nuclear power station

(3) Surrounding areas: Worries are growing with progress in monitoring

2. Recent electric power supply and developments related to energy policy

(1) New cabinet and energy debate

(2) Restriction on the usage of electricity and request for electricity conservation

(3) Tough stance of the heads of host communities

(4) Public opinions: Opinion polls, Crossroads in national debate and expectations for the new government.

Thanks to KNI-WEC and Japanese WEC Member Committees for the continuous update. As we know, every one is continuous looking at this.

Link: Report 1, Report 2, Report 3.

Ministerial Meeting: Golden Opportunity for ASEAN Energy Connectivity

Energy plays a crucial role in economic development and will remain critical to the continued economic growth of the ASEAN region. Recognised this issue and the greater volatility in global energy markets due to economic uncertainty in several developed countries, political instability in the Middle East and North Africa, and renewed concerns over the use of nuclear power following the March 2011 earthquake and nuclear accidents in Japan, ten Ministers on energy from ten ASEAN Member Countries were met in Jerudong, Brunei Darussalam, on 20 September 2011, on the occasion of the 29th ASEAN Ministers on Energy Meeting (AMEM). This meeting was very crucial as this was the first ministerial meeting since the adoption of the Master Plan on ASEAN Connectivity by the ASEAN Leaders at the 17th ASEAN Summit on 28 October 2010. As ASEAN steps up efforts on regional integration and connectivity activities, the Ministers re-affirmed the ASEAN Leaders’ statement to collaborate on more concrete and action oriented programs to boost energy efficiency and conservation, and find viable renewable energy sources, so as to reduce the region’s dependence on oil and other fossil fuels.

ASEAN was located at the crossroads of an economically vibrant and growing region bounded by India in the west; China, Japan, and the Republic of Korea in the Northeast; and Australia and New Zealand in the South. ASEAN thus has the potential to physically anchor itself as the hub of this region. ASEAN recognized by enhancing intra-regional connectivity within ASEAN and its subregional grouping would benefit all ASEAN Member States and would significantly narrow the development gap within ASEAN. Hence it is important for AMEM to discuss directions and targets of key energy matters crucial to the realisation of both the ASEAN Connectivity and eventually the aspiration of an ASEAN Community by 2015. Read more